Monthly Archives: March 2014

Why DPS Carbon Skis Stand Out

2e1ax_default_entry_IMG_5980That’s What She Said

 You know how your grandma says you’ll know immediately when you’ve found “The One”? She was right. It took only a few turns and I fell deeply in love with my DPS Yvette 112RP carbon skis.

 DPS – Heard of them?

Yes, smart guy, I’ve heard what you think DPS stands for. Thanks for telling me anyway and grossing me out on the chairlift. I don’t know you and it’s creepy.

 In 2005 pro skier/ski designer Stephan Drake joined forces with ski engineer Peter Turner and DPS was born. It stands for Drake PowderworkS, and the company seeks to “create the perfect skis worthy of those who live and breathe the sport”.   DPS is known worldwide for its trailblazing technology, shaping, and durability.  They are the world’s only company to create a “Pure prepreg carbon fiber sandwich ski”. Their Pure3 skis are manufactured at their factory in Salt Lake City. Made in the USA!

 Big and Pink and Beautiful

 If you don’t recognize the name, I bet you’d recognize the skis. In contrast to the industry standard, DPS has chosen solid top sheets in optimistic colors with minimalist logos. They stand out in both looks and performance.

 The Pure carbon Yvettes are HOT pink, and just looking at them makes me happy. It’s not just their shimmery unicorn candy heart color, but for their shape and feel. I’ve always been more tomboy than princess – but these Pure carbon skis are beauty and beast. DPS doesn’t dumb down the technology and slap on a pretty top sheet for the ladies. The Yvettes are based on the geometry of the acclaimed DPS Wailers: 141/112/128. The tip rocker is 480mm, which enables the Yvettes to shine in the powder. They’re responsive and do well in a variety of snow conditions.

Confession, I should admit that I telemark. I’ll wait while you tell an out-of-date telemark joke. Haha, done? I think I rode the chairlift with you earlier.

 I mounted my Yvettes with TwentyTwo Design’s Axl bindings.   It’s my dream set up. The Yvette 178cm weigh 1700 grams, or 3.75 pounds each. My Axl bindings (small) weigh 1.9 pounds each. SO combined they weigh 5.65 pounds, which is less than a six-pack. They’re so light that in contrast it felt like there were no skis on my feet.

 Ski the Space Age

DPS pioneered the carbon ski technology utilized at its Salt Lake factory. Similar technology is used in jet fighters and spacecraft. The prepreg carbon used by DPS is spawns freakishly lightweight, torsionally stiff skis. My Yvettes float like a dream in the pow, bust the crud, and carve the corduroy. Ideally we would all have an assortment of skis for different conditions. But if you have to survive with one pair, this would be my pick.

Don’t believe me? Demo a pair 3/21 at Big Sky Resort from 9:30am to 3:00pm, or swing in to Grizzly to check them out.

The Unsung Ski Sock

2e1ax_default_entry_IMG_2955The Unsung Ski Sock

If I had a dollar for every kid who has come into my shop to rent skis wearing a thick pair of cotton tube socks, I would be a rich man. Socks don’t matter. Or do they? Here are a few thoughts on what ski socks to buy for every ski occasion.

On a ski vacation and renting ski equipment? This is one of the few times I will recommend a thicker sock. Definitely not cotton though. Stick with wool, which is my preference for both comfort and their natural anti-microbial characteristics. If you are allergic or have a strong aversion to wool, go with a synthetic. Rental boots tend to fit on the large side, so a mid-weight will take up some slop, have some padding for your shins to reduce the dreaded shin bang, and provide some extra warmth. Remember that warm ski boots depend on good circulation and being DRY. This applies to having both dry ski boot liners and dry ski socks.

Buying new Boots? Go thin. Pick your fabric of choice. My preference is merino wool. Thin socks will give the most room in your new boots, which should fit tightly. Trying on new ski boots with thick socks will give you a false sense of the size. Odds are you will end up in a boot that is too big – a costly mistake!

Your ski boots have a few days on them? Experiment with progressively thicker socks until you find the pair that works the best. Ski socks come in a variety of thicknesses from ultra lightweight, to lightweight, to midweight. Feel the thickness of the socks at the foot, and you will notice the subtle differences in thickness. Some will have more padding on the shin, others none at all. If your boots still feel sloppy even with the thickest socks, it might be time for new boots.

Want to feel like superman? Try some compression ski socks. Like the socks used to aid in medical rehabilitation, compression socks vary how much they squeeze your ankles, mid calf, and calf. This helps pump blood out of the legs and back to the heart, slowing fatigue and aiding in recovery. It’s not a gimmick and is well worth the price of admission.

Keep those feet dry!

Ken Lancey, Owner